What’s in the backpack?

Next time: I’m taking a robot

 

Whats in the backpack?

I thought I’d do just a little on the changing technology landscape, this time in terms of what I use personally.

For three days at EduTech this time I just took my 64GB iPad, installed with Telstra 4G and a Brydge Bluetooth keyboard, an IPhone and one charger. This worked well, except for the one charger business; a full day out at a conference note-taking, twittering and occasionally checking on Outlook as to what’s happening back at school, takes its toll and both devices were seriously depleted by day’s end. It would have been better to charge both overnight but I certainly enjoyed the lightness of the iPad, especially on conference seating with no desk or table.

For the writing, I began by using OneNote to take my notes, but I decided I wanted to blog the sessions on the spot and found a great blogging tool for the iPad called BlogPad Pro. So, I switched to doing the note taking in Ulysses (my all-time favourite distraction-free text editor) and then exporting HTML directly into BlogPad via the clipboard. That worked pretty much flawlessly and I was also able to insert some images I’d taken along the way at some of the sessions.

They were just about the only apps I used over the three days: Ulysses, BlogPad Pro, Safari and Outlook, and I found that, more than ever at this conference, that unholy mix of Apple, Microsoft, Google and independent apps is more and more common. The Firbank session I attended (see blog notes) wasn’t the only school that was happily using a real mix of technologies, albeit mostly tying to find a dashboard for them all, usually via an LMS.

It was funny, looking around at all the fancy technology and heavy-duty laptops on display, that I found the iPad worked well (despite the naysayers and the prophets of doom from various quarters) but it only works well for me with the keyboard attached.

I did spend a long time at one morning tea looking over the various Chromebooks at the Google stand and they are appealing. For less than $400 you can get a light, long-powered, keyboard driven computer; for around $100 a Chrome dongle that contains a computer – just add screen and keyboard. I’m tempted to say that’s a better option than a haphazard BYOD program, but I’m still thinking about that.

 

 

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Reflections on EduTech

Program or be Programmed

I always come away from a big conference with a mixture of big ideas, cynicism, idealism and genuine tiredness, mostly in equal measures. In a big conference (5000+) like EduTech you can get lost in the streams and the conversations and never come to anything at the end. So, some final reflections from my Qantas flight home.

  • The various strands work well, but they probably too broad. Ed-Leaders? I’d like to see some more specialised strands: PD, LMS integration, maker-spaces, these are all potential conferences within the conference
  • Some of the keynotes seem short and a bit rushed
  • It’s driven by the makers of tech ..we’re along for the ride. If we aren’t the product, we are being actively marketed as the buyer of it. Most speakers had something to sell, some more obviously than others.
  • Besides the games which sort of worked, a bit more interactivity wold be good at times, but sometimes that ‘stand up and talk to the person next to you’ is just a bit tokenistic and annoying.
  • STEM is everywhere. That, and making, scratching, coding, playing and building. ‘How many of you are planning a maker-space?’, one speaker asked. Lots of hands shot up. There were drones and robots in equal measure; I was waiting for them to fight each other.
  • The interactive white board thing is done.
  • The flipped classroom thing is hanging in there.
  • I’ve got to think again about what good PD looks like; I was ashamed at myself for not doing more to respect teacher prior knowledge and individual pathways, even if they follow school-wide goals. This is my new goal.
  • I wanted to explore more feedback options (apps and devices) and there were plenty that I hadn’t seen before, and want to explore with my own class before I try them with teachers.
  • LMS proliferation continues, but our choice of Schoolbox seems to be more than holding its own in this space. Major competitors seemed to be Firefly (UK) and Canvas (USA) but I saw nothing startling out there that justified a major re-examination. One problem is that some of the textbook makers also pretend to be an LMS. To me, the future LMS will integrate beautifully with the full range of learning tools; you want Office Mix, OneNote, Yammer, but you also want Google Forms, collaborative Docs and to be able to embed YouTube and ClickView.
  • Teachers are pretty dedicated. They get up, they do their best. They want to learn, they want to help their students. For many of them, getting away for a couple of days with peers like this, is pretty special, and very valued.

Google VR

With Rupert Denton from ClickView

The Main Stage

Coding

View from inside

Brisbane

 

The DNA of a STEM Academy

2016-05-31 11.22.45

DNA of a STEM School

Amanda Fox

@AmandaFoxSTEM

The STEM Academy at Bartlett

Fox talked about the DNA of a STEM school, wearing a DNA inspired dress to do it. She talked about STEM as a trans-disciplinary approach, and talked about her journey over the last few year as a social science teacher, arguing that STEM had to change year after year.

It was interesting to hear about the journey; how she’d been involved in hiring and creating the team and the changes that had taken place in such a short time. I was interested I want to know more about how to make STEM actually work in a subject orientated culture. Some of the things she stressed were:

  • Adaptability. Don’t keep doing things that aren’t working
  • Content comes after you teach it for a while
  • Rigorous curriculum: Problem solving, trans-disciplinary, story-centred, real world
  • A story-centred curriculum
  • ‘Tell your story before someone else does it for you’

They set ‘grand challenges’ that run over nine week intervals, solving a problem like creating a ‘planetary rover’, renewing urban infrastructure. They used iTunes U courses and student worked through the course. Students also worked in teams, fostered community involvement and had on-site visits and field trips.

Session Details

STEM DNA: Design, Narrative, Application

We all know what STEM stands for…Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics…but what does it look like in action? How can you design transdisciplinary, problem based curricula that is unique to your school and community?

Amanda share the narrative of what it’s like to be teacher in a STEM public school; how we began; what is the curriculum, and how in just three years they have evolved to be considered THE top middle grades certified STEM program in the nation. Decode the genome of their transdisciplinary approach, and learn what you can transplant to your own program.

Amanda Fox, Film and Broadcasting Instructor, The STEM Academy (USA)

 

 

One model does not fit all

 

One model does not fit all

This session by Tamara Sullivan focused on professional development, and used sli.do to gather delegate feedback. One thing I’ve been focusing on is feedback tools and this was a new one to me.

Sullivan used the AITSL learning design model to frame professional learning at her school. They ask ‘what is the purpose of this PD, and is that clear to participants?’ She took us through the process her school had gone through in trying to instil 21C skills across the curriculum.

This bit became a bit specific to her school and her problem, but she was able to unpack it and think about the bigger principles, though those threads could have been made more explicit.

Some of the core principles and practice she talked about were:

  • Clear purpose, clear purpose to participants
  • Collaborative
  • The tools, features, design, accessibility
  • Taking a ‘flipped classroom’ approach to PD in lieu of physical attendance after school (highly collaborative, self-directed, respecting teachers as learners, aligned to priorities, sustainable, modelled 21C pedagogies and technologies.
  • Shared ownership of the change (6 leaders took a course and became mentors/coaches)
  • These coaches then made the ‘flipped’ modules, using Office Mix.
  • Teachers were then asked to do something practical with the learning – Level 1, Level 2 or Level 3 responses.
  • One purpose was to MODEL their tools. As an Office 365 school they used Office Mix, Yammer, Mosaic and SharePoint. Yammer was important, she argued, in encouraging participation.
  • This learning was followed up with a survey (using Excel?) and a three hour whole staff workshop to look at practice: looking at action plans and auditing existing tasks and assessment.
  • Other factors: a Learning Innovations Committee (about 30 staff)

I liked this session. I had some things to take back to school. I was impressed with the strategic thinking involved and the respect for teachers as learners.

Session details

One model does not fit all – Professional development for the 21st century teacher

Educators around the world are undertaking school wide reforms to ensure that they are preparing students to live and work successfully in the 21st century and beyond. However, teacher professional development is not always designed or delivered to meet the needs of the 21st century teacher. So how can we restructure professional learning to ensure that all teachers are well equipped to cater for the needs of students in today’s environment? This presentation will explore practical strategies to transform professional development at a school level to develop the competencies of lifelong learning for both students and educators.

Tamara Sullivan, Dean of E-Learning, Ormiston College

 

 

Endless Possibilities (tinkering to Utopia)

Endless possibilities: Liberating mindsets to effect change

Anthony Muhammad, PH.D.

This was a nice start to the day, opening with the big questions: like why do we have a public school system (quoted Tinkering towards Utopia) though pretty US-centric for all that. (grade-point average, college enrolment data etc.)

Muhammad argued that change was necessary for equity (and the achievement gap) and there were two forms of change needed:

  • Techno-structural (skills)
  • Cultural (will)

He argued that the cultural stuff is by far the most difficult. Using a gardening metaphor, he described culture as the ‘soil’, the technology as the plants.

Muhammad was particularly strong against the US model of failing schools, failing teachers, standardised testing etc. ‘Don’t do it’, he said. Yay, I replied silently in my seat. He argued for a move from meritocracy to egalitarian systems, and gave examples of egalitarian systems that education might aspire to. (like medicine, law enforcement and fire services, some of which had big holes in them aka ‘black lives matter’)

He called for a change to change mindsets, and two clashing mindsets (the superiority mindset, and the victim mindset) Schools that have one, or both, of these mindsets, have very big challenges in trying to improve. Superiority mindset is based on paternalism, competition and ‘standard-bearing’ (my construct is the best, and the only construct through which I define myself and others) THe victim mindset has irresponsibility, low motivation and low expectations of self.

He concluded with a liberation mindset with three commitments:

  1. A commitment to equality
  2. A commitment to responsibility as educators
  3. Advocacy (Dont’ be silent, advocate)

It was a good, aspirational, optimistic big-picture session. A great start to the day and not a gadget or gizmo in sight.

Session description

Endless Possibilities: Liberating mindsets to effect change

This session will explore the connection between personal/ institutional mindsets and substantive change. Schools have historically had a difficult time changing with the needs of the society and the primary culprit is our thinking. Technology and innovation are only as effective as the mindset of the people who use them.

 

 

Fast and slow learners

Fast and slow learning at Amesbury

Some great principles from Amesbury School in NZ

  • Fast and slow learning (15 minutes)
  • Self-testing (Kahootz)
  • Status indicators: Red cup means ‘I’m in flow’ (Do not disturb) even in open space
  • Collaborative and solitude
  • Tents. Yes, tents.
  • One minute meditation (YouTube)
  • Online collaboration

Session Details

Paradoxical Education: Meeting the needs of our 21st century learners

As a new school which opened in 2012, Amesbury’s vision is for every child to continually fulfil his/her potential. This means every child gaining knowledge, skills and attributes; becoming “insiders” in the existing social orders – especially the community of learners; and, every student developing as an empowered and joyful human being. Lesley will share the pedagogical approaches that underpin what they do, and the practices that enable in eduation: “weak” and “strong”, ”risky” and “risk-free”, “predictable” and “unpredictable” – paradoxical education that meets the needs of 21st century learners.

Dr Lesley Murrihy, Principal, Amesbury School, Wellington (NZ)

 

 

Implementing an LMS

Implementing an LMS

Paul Mears (Firbank GS)

http://www.scoop.it/paulmears

@paulmears

Paul talked about

1 How to be strategic with human-centred design

2 selection process of an LMC

3 Implementing for success

This was interesting, beginning with a focus on ‘human centred thinking and design. ‘Opportunities, not problems’, which came out of Stanford.

He argued for ‘shadowing’, observation, interviews … and the importance of ‘student agency’ Bring the students in, give them respect and they’ll rise to the occasion.

When he talked to students the students hated the ‘mushrooms’ that had popped up with different teachers all doing their own things. They wanted to select a unifying LMS and shared the process they used to select that company. (Firefly)

Mears prefers ‘integrated learning platform’ to LMS, as the platform should integrate diverse things like YouTube, ClickView, Google Docs, PowerPoint

This was the most practical session I had for the day. Good advice, ‘The main thing is to make the main thing the main thing’