The Return of the Format Wars

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BETA vs VHS. BETA had the better quality video, but VHS won and ruled the roost forever. Or at least that’s how the story goes. One ring to rule them all.

Which reminds me of the Windows Vs Apple computer days; and as Apple looked like going from being THE educational computer corporation to fading away, the growth of the Windows laptops. This is well before iPhones came along, and the educational push for ‘standardisation’, for ‘ease of use’ (whose use?) and for ‘consistency’.

I lived that, including teaching in schools which recognised the ‘personal’ in personal computer, but insisted on rolling out one-size-fits-all Windows PCs, typically Toshibas to all the students from Year 7 to Year 12 whatever their differences. High maintenance tools for the masses and, if you were good, you could put your own sticker on the back.

So, I’ve been pleased to see in recent years, more nuanced approaches to computers in schools, more subtlety, more variation and, especially with the growth of mobile, the responses of companies like Microsoft and Google of bringing their tools to a wide variety of platforms, cross-platform, VHS AND Beta. Microsoft’s software like Microsoft OneNote, Teams and Office 365 offers unprecedented collaborative power from your phone to your desktop. These tools are platform agnostic, hardware agnostic.

Since then, we haven’t seen as much of the corporation wars on hardware: Microsoft touted the drawing and handwriting of the Surface Pros, Chrome pushed the login and go of the Chromebook and Apple pushed the ‘industry standard’ for the creative arts of the MacBooks. My own students, in this border-less world, have tended to choose Macs, maybe because of the phone effect, or fashion, or because they seem simpler. But, there are some ACERs and HPs thrown in, though I’ve yet to see a Chromebook in the ‘wild’ of my classroom.

Interesting then, to see this latest foray from Microsoft, going back to the old days in this ‘case study’ of *Lowanna College* which fond that BYOD ‘can compromise, rather than support, classroom learning.’

‘BYOD programs they felt introduced too much complexity and fragmentation; if a teacher was to ask a student to create a presentation on their computers using PowerPoint, everything ground to a halt because only some had a device, only some had PowerPoint.

The circuit breaker is Lowanna’s new IT strategy which comes into play early next year which will see all Year 7s use the school recommended device which has both touch screen and digital inking capability along with access to school recommended software including Office 365.

Before settling on the Acer B118 device Lowanna surveyed teachers about how they would like to use technology to enhance learning and also gave deep consideration to the levels of support and insurance for the devices, to minimise any learning interruption should a device be damaged or lost.’

So, we come full circle, or at least we return to the old play that the adults know what’s best, that complexity is bad and that we can’t have ‘everything grinding to a halt’ because of a lack of PowerPoint. If we get the hardware right, it seems to assert, everything else will fall into place. That hasn’t been my experience.

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The Second Coming of Microsoft

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If you’d told me ten years ago that I’d be excited about next year’s teaching with a bunch of Microsoft tools, I’d have told you were crazy.

At that stage Microsoft was on the skids: bloated old-fashioned desktop programs and slow to the internet. The software suite they had made their name on (aka Office) looked dated and oh so 20th Century. Worse, their cash-cow, Windoze, was a laughing stock just at the time when everyone was looking elsewhere for inspiration. With a resurgent Apple and the juggernaut that is Google, the end looked inevitable.

Cut to 2018 and things have shifted. Apple still makes the most beautiful shiny things but its software is hopeless (does iCloud even work?) A lot of teachers like some of the Google tools, and the Chromebooks have taken off, especially in the United States, but I think that might be driven by security conscious administrators with the bottom line in mind; I mean, have you ever used a Chromebook for anything substantial?

Re-enter Microsoft. Turned around and all internetted-up. The decision to make their programs ubiquitous (ie. tone down the reliance on a old desktop operating system) has not only seen the old standards re-vitalised as IOS apps, but also seen a growth in tools like OneNote, Sway, Teams, Planner, Forms, Stream that all play nicely within what feels like a mature and secure environment. Just as good, the pricing models, and the storage options, are attractive and well targeted to schools.

Not to mention OneNote Class Notebooks, which I’ve mentioned many times before. One of the best note-taking tools has morphed into the best technology based teaching tool I’ve seen.

So, I’m excited about 2019. We’ve rolled out Office 365 to students and staff and we’ve got an IT team who not only get it, but know how to make it work. We’ve already run some sessions that cunningly required using tools like Forms, and I’m planning to run a series of workshops later this year where teachers will choose from a range of possible professional learning opportunities.

The best thing? I’m hopeful we’re going to have a bunch of keen teachers equipped with some of the best learning tools yet, just raring to go. I’m looking forward to seeing what happens. Who’d have thought?

EduTech

Sitting at the airport waiting for a flight gives you time to think. I’m heading off to EduTech in Brisbane for a couple of days and am trying to figure out just what I hope to find out, that I couldn’t get from a Twitter Feed. 

Of course, there’s power in the networked connections you can make in conferences, but I’m hoping too that there’s more that I’ll come back to my school with.  I’ll blog my thinking over the next couple of days but I’m particularly interested in:

  • The state of play in the LMS world (and specifically where Schoolbox sits in that)
  • IOS student response systems and apps
  • Are there possibilities in Chromebooks I’ve ignored for too long?
  • What do the new iPad admin settings look like
  • How can I get on board the next OneNote thing
Mixed up bunch isn’t it? Tech agnostic: Google, Apple, Microsoft … I’ll be interested to see if I’m any clearer on some of these key questions by Tuesday night.
 
 

Driving an innovation industry

Driving an innovation agenda
Ian Williamson

Williamson began his talk about. innovation by emphasising how quickly things can dramatically change.

Only 21% of the 1982 Fortune 500 companies were still on the list in 1982. (aka Kodak and Polaroid and Motorola) He asked the question, ‘why didn’t Sony invent the iPod?’

He argued that no one is immune- ‘Higher education is now ground zero for disruption.’

The biggest barriers to innovation:

  • risk averse culture
  • lengthy development time
  • not enough good ideas

Innovation requires leadership and recognise that different types of knowledge are needed for invention and harnessing (from thought to implementation). He argued for collaboration and integration, using Apple as an example.

Code like a girl

So, in the interest of diverse opinion, in respect to the last post, I post this video of girl coders from the recent Apple WWDC Conference. I’m all for empowering girls to be what they want to be, and love the advice here: ‘don’t give up, just because it’s dominated by men’.

BTW: I still don’t think compulsory coding is a good idea! These kids all really wanted to make things happen.

OneNote Unchained

I’ve always said in recent years that the only thing keeping me interested in the Windows platform was OneNote.

Over the past five years or so I’ve gradually re-invested in the Apple platform after abandoning it for the Windows machines of various 1-1 notebooks programs over the years including Toshibas, ACER, Fujitsu, IBMs and others. I bought an iPod, then an iPhone and an iPad and then a Mac Mini. Back to the Mac; since my first computer at work was an Apple 2, and the first computer I bought was an Apple 2C, so sleek and modern at the time. I had a Mac Classic all those years ago.

So I was pretty interested to see Microsoft finally release a Mac version of OneNote this week. At last! And free! OneNote has been my favourite Microsoft Office component on Windows for a long time, (it’s my central teaching tool) and now it’s on the Mac, syncing via OneDrive.

The Mac version isn’t quite as full-featured; is pretty light on features: it lacks tight integration with Outlook, for example and I can’t see sub-sections or a way to move stuff around.  But it’s finally there and a worthy developing competitor of Evernote at last. It’s on the Mac App Store and went to No. 1 straight away.

Makes me want to go out and buy a Macbook, which I’m sure isn’t exactly what Microsoft intended!

If you haven’t heard about OneNote, check out some of the links below:

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External links:

5 Ways to make use of OneNote for Students

4 Tips for Students using OneNote

OneNote is a note-taking Power Tool (Lifehacker)

Teaching and Learning with OneNote