windows

The Second Coming of Microsoft

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If you’d told me ten years ago that I’d be excited about next year’s teaching with a bunch of Microsoft tools, I’d have told you were crazy.

At that stage Microsoft was on the skids: bloated old-fashioned desktop programs and slow to the internet. The software suite they had made their name on (aka Office) looked dated and oh so 20th Century. Worse, their cash-cow, Windoze, was a laughing stock just at the time when everyone was looking elsewhere for inspiration. With a resurgent Apple and the juggernaut that is Google, the end looked inevitable.

Cut to 2018 and things have shifted. Apple still makes the most beautiful shiny things but its software is hopeless (does iCloud even work?) A lot of teachers like some of the Google tools, and the Chromebooks have taken off, especially in the United States, but I think that might be driven by security conscious administrators with the bottom line in mind; I mean, have you ever used a Chromebook for anything substantial?

Re-enter Microsoft. Turned around and all internetted-up. The decision to make their programs ubiquitous (ie. tone down the reliance on a old desktop operating system) has not only seen the old standards re-vitalised as IOS apps, but also seen a growth in tools like OneNote, Sway, Teams, Planner, Forms, Stream that all play nicely within what feels like a mature and secure environment. Just as good, the pricing models, and the storage options, are attractive and well targeted to schools.

Not to mention OneNote Class Notebooks, which I’ve mentioned many times before. One of the best note-taking tools has morphed into the best technology based teaching tool I’ve seen.

So, I’m excited about 2019. We’ve rolled out Office 365 to students and staff and we’ve got an IT team who not only get it, but know how to make it work. We’ve already run some sessions that cunningly required using tools like Forms, and I’m planning to run a series of workshops later this year where teachers will choose from a range of possible professional learning opportunities.

The best thing? I’m hopeful we’re going to have a bunch of keen teachers equipped with some of the best learning tools yet, just raring to go. I’m looking forward to seeing what happens. Who’d have thought?

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First term in a new school

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Above: Buddy Day at ACMI. Photo: Warrick

It’s hard to believe that I’m about to finish term 1 in my new school, and I haven’t blogged about it yet.

Perhaps it’s still too new, and certainly too busy, to reflect properly on the excitement, the challenges and the possibilities of a new place.

In terms of teaching; I’m teaching Year 9 for the first time in a long time, and no Year 12. The conversations are very different but I’ve enjoyed the shift in lots of ways, and have always thought that you can make a big difference in a Middle School classroom.

In terms of technology, it’s a mixed place. There are IWBs that no-one uses much, Windows laptops for staff, a BYOD program 10-12 and an iPad program 7-9.

So, I’m teaching with iPads for the first time, supplemented by Jacaranda+ texts and some good old paper. I’ve been using OneNote in my own teaching (of course) but am itching to get Office 365 going in the school, and to get OneNote notebooks up and running.

I’ll reserve the iPads for a separate post sometime. They work well: reliable, great battery, portable, app-friendly. The students like them, and don’t mind typing on them (I bought a Brydge keyboard for mine as I don’t like typing on the screen) Of course, the problem remains switching between writing and reading so the need for paper as well, which I don’t like. I bring my heavy Windows HP notebook to most classes, mainly because I can’t plug an iPad into the IWB and the Apple TV solution hasn’t worked well. There’s room for some improvement there.

Otherwise, everything is new. It’s a smaller school so you’re across multiple roles more, some of which are pretty new to me. Being in a new school reminds you how students must feel going into new classrooms with new teachers every year. It’s been refreshing, but I hope to be able to blog more regularly from now on.

Below: Getting started, note Brydge iPad keyboard. Photo: Warrick

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OneNote Unchained

I’ve always said in recent years that the only thing keeping me interested in the Windows platform was OneNote.

Over the past five years or so I’ve gradually re-invested in the Apple platform after abandoning it for the Windows machines of various 1-1 notebooks programs over the years including Toshibas, ACER, Fujitsu, IBMs and others. I bought an iPod, then an iPhone and an iPad and then a Mac Mini. Back to the Mac; since my first computer at work was an Apple 2, and the first computer I bought was an Apple 2C, so sleek and modern at the time. I had a Mac Classic all those years ago.

So I was pretty interested to see Microsoft finally release a Mac version of OneNote this week. At last! And free! OneNote has been my favourite Microsoft Office component on Windows for a long time, (it’s my central teaching tool) and now it’s on the Mac, syncing via OneDrive.

The Mac version isn’t quite as full-featured; is pretty light on features: it lacks tight integration with Outlook, for example and I can’t see sub-sections or a way to move stuff around.  But it’s finally there and a worthy developing competitor of Evernote at last. It’s on the Mac App Store and went to No. 1 straight away.

Makes me want to go out and buy a Macbook, which I’m sure isn’t exactly what Microsoft intended!

If you haven’t heard about OneNote, check out some of the links below:

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External links:

5 Ways to make use of OneNote for Students

4 Tips for Students using OneNote

OneNote is a note-taking Power Tool (Lifehacker)

Teaching and Learning with OneNote